Photo by Easy_Asa/iStock / Getty Images
Photo by Easy_Asa/iStock / Getty Images
 
My aim is to exploit this market in which a well-told story can be traded in for a change in mindset: not just of the African but of the outside world, that looks in. 
— Yaba
 

I started Tail's End because I had a conspiracy theory about storytelling and development, thanks in no small part to football. 

In June 2006, the Ghana Black Stars made their debut in the 18th FIFA Football World Cup. Then with a ground-breaking 2-1 victory against the United States, the nation’s football team secured their place in the second stage of the competition as Africa’s sole representative . With one goal, these unintentional storytellers awoke a nation’s pride and self-confidence using a simple narrative, 

The Third World could outperform The First

Our minds were inspired and the ripple effects of said awakening took less than a year to manifest. Two months in, local taxis had retired their Brazilian flags for the red, gold and green. Ghanaians abroad were pulling out their dusty passports and proudly declaring, "Mi ye Ghaneni!" And everyone who was anyone owned an 'I-swear-to-you-Essien-wear-am-saf' jersey. By December, Ghanaian protagonists had restructured Ghana’s Poverty Reduction Proposal and procured the largest Millenium Challenge Compact Fund to date (USD 5,009,476). In 2007, oil was discovered. By 2011, we were the fastest growing economy with a GDP of 20.146% from 4.5% in 2010. And somewhere in between those years the Ghanaian dance, Azonto, hit the global stage, and threatened to stay.

Something fundamental had changed in the Ghanaian psyche: And although this surge in national pride may not have caused the opportunities that followed, it did prepare the nation to take full advantage when they showed up.

In other words, a fantastic story was told about our abilities and it was so good, we believed it. 

With Tail's End, my aim is to exploit this market in which a well-told story can be traded in for a change in mindset: not just of the African but of the outside world, that looks in. 

Because 8 years later, we all witnessed the damage a bad story could inspire, when the Black Stars showed up for a pitiful round 3.